Recent Events
 •   School of Arts and Social Sciences
 •   Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration
 •   School of Education and Languages
 •   School of Science and Technology
 •   University Research Centre
Upcoming Events
 •   Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration
 •   School of Science and Technology
 •   University Research Centre

Home > Recent and Upcoming Events > Recent Events in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration

Recent Events in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration

Events organized by the Institute of International Business and Governance (IIBG)

Seminar on ‘Business ecosystems: A new business system research frontier’

On 25 April 2017, Prof. Stuart Orr — Honorary Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration and Director of the Doctor of Business Administration in the Deakin Business School at Deakin University — gave a seminar on business ecosystems. This is a new kind of adaptive business community where customers, partners, competitors and suppliers collaborate in creating and sharing resources. These systems, characterized by innovation capacity, loose coupling of actors, resource development capacity, flexibility and adaptation, were developed in response to disruptions in the business environment. Prof. Orr also presented a Business Ecosystem theory which formed the basis for empirical testing.

Seminar on ‘Situated knowledge in power relations: Its legitimization, sharing and appropriation’

On 26 April 2017, Dr Eddie Law, Assistant Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on situated knowledge as distinguished from the objectified and commodified conception of knowledge that is prevalent in existing knowledge management literature. Dr Law attempted to theorize the ‘knowledge-as-situated-practice’ perspective through centring on the industry of bamboo scaffolding in Hong Kong by interviewing scaffolding managers and frontline scaffolders, paying attention to how the latter displayed highly tacit and situated risk assessment knowledge in their work.


Seminar on ‘Sustainable human resource management: Rethinking a conceptual framework’


On 10 May 2017, Dr Alex Mak, Assistant Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on the ongoing conceptual development of sustainable human resource management. Dr Mak argued that, so far, the conceptual foundation for sustainable development has been based on three bottom-line concepts; and scholars have addressed each of these separately, instead of treating them as an interrelated whole. Dr Mak pointed out that sustainable management of human resources could only be truly facilitated if we trace its conceptual origin in terms of scope and function.




Seminar on ‘On motivating sustainable consumption: The contrasting effects of guilt and shame emotions’

On 24 May 2017, Dr Maggie Chu, Assistant Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on the contrasting effects of emotions (guilt and shame) on wasteful consumption. In this seminar, Dr Chu argued that people with guilt focus on the bad behaviours committed, while those with shame focus on the bad qualities in themselves. It was speculated that the emotions of guilt and shame have different effects on the likelihood of discouraging wasteful consumption on the part of consumers. It was also suggested that, if waste-reducing behaviour is instrumental in bringing social approval, the negative impact of shame would be alleviated.

Seminar on ‘Shorting activity and return predictability: Evidence from an information shock’

On 31 May 2017, Prof. Jeong-bon Kim — IIBG Distinguished Professor, Professor & J. Page R. Wadsworth Chair in Accounting & Finance, and the PhD Programme Director in the School of Accounting and Finance in the University of Waterloo — gave a seminar investigating whether and how an exogenous shock to the public information environment, as a result of the mandatory adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and other regulatory changes in 2005, related to short sellers’ use of private information. The finding suggested that mandatory IFRS and regulatory changes would decrease the information advantage of short sellers by crowding out their use of private information.

Seminar on ‘The moderating role of dynamic managerial capabilities in the relationship between asset specificity and entry mode choice: A case of small and medium-sized enterprises’

On 7 June 2017, Ms Sindy Chung, Lecturer in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on transaction cost economics — a widely embraced framework in analyzing foreign entry mode selection for enterprises. In this seminar, Ms Chung noted that by taking dynamic managerial capabilities (managerial social capital, managerial cognition, and managerial human capital) into consideration, a wider perspective would be available for analyzing how entrepreneurial capabilities can reduce hazards arising from behavioural and environmental instabilities, thereby safeguarding asset specificity, the main driver of transaction cost economics.

Seminar on ‘Family board representation and relative CEO compensation’

On 21 June 2017, Dr Tak-yan Leung, Associate Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on the determinants of CEO pay relative to workers’ pay in Chinese family firms, with particular interest in the effectiveness of board monitoring in alleviating agency problems related to executive compensation. Dr Leung noted that family firms with greater family board representation award higher relative CEO compensation. Board independence can dilute family influence on boards in determining the relative CEO compensation. Overall, it was suggested that variation in a board’s composition determines its potential for alleviating agency problems in family firms.

Seminar on ‘The power of relationships inside and outside work settings on achieving work-life balance’

On 5 July 2017, Dr Rebecca Lau, Associate Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on the topic of work-life balance. Dr Lau proposed that an individual’s relationships with others inside and outside organizational settings may help one to achieve work-life balance. On the basis of social exchange theory, it was proposed that when an individual develops close relationships with coworkers, he/she receives resources that can improve his/her functioning at work. Likewise, close relationships with others in the family and community can bring various resources that can improve his/her arrangements in family life. In addition, one may receive resources that are cross-domain — that is resources related to the work life from the family and community, as well as resources related to the family life from work. The availability of these resources from either domain can improve the quality of the other domain, leading to work-life enrichment.

Seminar on ‘Personality and contextual influence on team-member exchange’

On 19 July 2017, Dr Rebecca Lau, Associate Professor in the Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, gave a seminar on personality and contextual influence on team-member exchange (TMX). It investigated how a propensity to trust, reciprocation wariness, and exchange ideology may have an impact on TMX, and how task interdependence and shared leadership may interact with these personality traits to promote or hinder TMX, in view of the benefits of TMX and the limited studies on its antecedents. This examination provided practitioners with insights on strengthening team members’ exchange relationships with appropriate work design. The seminar also explored how TMX may be associated with work-life balance. Such exploration might suggest for practitioners an economical way to help employees achieve a better balance between their work life and family life.

    

 

© Copyright 2017. The Open University of Hong Kong. All Rights Reserved.