Recent Events
 •   University Research Centre (URC)
 •   Institute for Research in Innovative Technology and Sustainability (IRITS)
 •   Research Institute for Digital Culture and Humanities (RIDCH)
 •   Institute of International Business and Governance (IIBG)
 •   Institute for Research in Open and Innovative Education (IROPINE)
Upcoming Events
 •   University Research Centre (URC)
 •   Institute for Research in Innovative Technology and Sustainability (IRITS)
 •   Research Institute for Digital Culture and Humanities (RIDCH)
 •   Institute for Research in Open and Innovative Education (IROPINE)
 •   Li Ka Shing Institute of Professional and Continuing Education (LiPACE)

Home > Recent and Upcoming Events > Recent Events in the University Research Centre (URC)

Recent Events in the University Research Centre (URC)

Workshop on Scopus Training
Seminar on  ‘Collecting Learning Insights: Unpacking the Complexity of Learning Analytics’
Seminar on  ‘Theories of Mobile Learning and their Applications’and Workshop on  ‘Illustration of Applying Theories in Mobile Learning Research’
Seminar on  ‘Publishing in Academic Journals: Tips to help you succeed’
Seminar on  ‘Both Sides of the Table: Being a Researcher and Reviewer in the Humanities and Creative Arts’
Seminar on  ‘Success Factors in Mobile Learning Research’ and Workshop on  ‘Experience Sharing and Discussion on Mobile Learning Research’
Workshop on  ‘Useful Databases and Analytical Tools: Learning Analytics for the Social Media Age’


Workshop on Scopus Training

Scopus is a database of peer-reviewed literature covering the scientific journals, books and conference proceedings from more than 5,000 publishers. A workshop on Scopus training was co-organized by the Library and URC on 1 April 2016.

Ms Carol Cheng, the Client Consultant of Research Solution Management from Elsevier China and Hong Kong, led the workshop, covering the use of Scopus functions to track, analyse and visualize research outputs. She introduced different types of search techniques, and discussed ways to track the affiliation and researchers using the Scopus database.

Scopus has been subscribed to by the University Library. For details of its use, please click here.

<back to top>

Seminar on  ‘Collecting Learning Insights: Unpacking the Complexity of Learning Analytics’

Dr Shane Dawson, the Director of the Teaching Innovation Unit at the University of South Australia, gave a seminar entitled ‘Collecting Learning Insights: Unpacking the Complexity of Learning Analytics’ on 14 April. In the seminar, Dr Dawson reminded managers and administrators to be very clear about what the data collected through learning analytics are for. It is also critical, according to the speaker, to establish earlier support process, which could even be at a point before the first class meeting of the semester. Data from a number of universities have shown that early intervention leads to a marked improvement in retention.

Dr Dawson also discussed another area in which learning analytics has great potential — identifying students who need better support and predicting student behaviours. By drawing a sociogram, which is a graphic representation of the network structure offering information on the strength of ties, key players and cohesion, the data make it possible to visualize student relationships and student activities. Social Networks Adapting Pedagogical Practice, or SNAPP, is an innovative model that provides educators with a tool to monitor student networking as a way to measure students’ progress in a course or over a period of time. Alternatively, the model can also offer a visualization of choices students can make about their curriculum and the possible pathways to degree completion. Learning analytics is an innovative educational tool and an emerging field of research, but Dr Dawson also noted that, due to very few university-wide examples of learning analytics adoption around the world, there is still a lot of work to be done. In Australia, where the speaker comes from, a national project to benchmark the status, policy and practices of learning analytics is now underway.

<back to top>

Seminar on ‘Theories of Mobile Learning and their Applications’ and Workshop on ‘Illustration of Applying Theories in Mobile Learning Research’

In mobile learning, affordance is critical to a technology’s success. Defined as the action one can perform on an object, affordance fleshes out the hands-on relationship between users and their mobile devices. Dr David Parsons, National Postgraduate Director of Mind Lab by Unitec, New Zealand, gave a seminar entitled ‘Theories of Mobile Learning and their Applications’ and a workshop on ‘Illustration of Applying Theories in Mobile Learning Research’ on 27 April 2016. He focused on the latest mobile applications that can expand the smartphone’s educational use.

The Mind Lab is a partnership between an education provider offering postgraduate degree programmes and an educational lab researching and promoting digital literacy among teachers. It combines a purpose-built creative learning environment and online learning. In the workshop, Dr Parsons illustrated the smartphone apps ARIS, Kahoot and Aurasma for educational purposes, showing how a smart device’s embedded facilities, such as its GPS and phone camera, can help students to learn and share their knowledge. According to the speaker, as researchers attempt to devise theories of mobile learning, the theories need to be tested on new learning tools and pedagogies, and take account of the mobility and educational contexts of learners.

<back to top>

Seminar on ‘Publishing in Academic Journals: Tips to help you succeed’

On 19 May, Ms Lyndsey Dixon, Regional Journals Editorial Director of Asia Pacific, Taylor & Francis Group, gave a presentation on tips to help colleagues succeed in publishing in academic journals. The first step to success for prospective authors, Ms Dixon said, is to check the aims and scope of the journals so that they can choose the right journals to which they can submit their manuscripts. The manuscripts submitted will often be vetted by the editor-in-chief or the executive editor, depending on the journal, and then go through a peer review process.

Ms Dixon dispelled some of the myths about publishing in academic journals, and cautioned prospective authors about faux pas. For instance, the same manuscripts should not be submitted to other journals. Multiple submission is considered as misconduct by many journals, and it is easily discovered as many experts serve in multiple editorial boards. While the review process can be daunting for many people, Ms Dixon encouraged prospective authors to ask the editors for guidance, and accept the reviewers’ feedback with good grace.

Prof. Lee Wing-on, Vice President (Administration and Development) was the respondent at the seminar. From his many years of editorship for various journals, he echoed Ms Dixon’s suggestions with regard to manuscript submission. While it is true that very rarely is a manuscript accepted and published as it stands, Prof. Lee added that prospective authors actually have much to gain from the review process. An author may have to substantially revise his or her manuscript several times before an article is finally accepted for publication. Often, the final version is far superior to the original manuscript. Prof. Lee remarked that perseverance may pay off in the end.

Publishing in an academic journal is a long, painstaking process, but it is also a rewarding experience. For this reason, Prof. Lee encourages OUHK researchers to disseminate their research findings. The lively conversation between Ms Dixon and Prof. Lee provoked many questions and answers. Seminar participants took away Ms Dixon’s helpful suggestions and a variety of complimentary printed reference materials her team had brought to the seminar.

<back to top>

Seminar on ‘Both Sides of the Table: Being a Researcher and Reviewer in the Humanities and Creative Arts’

On 27 June, Matthew Turner, Professor Emeritus of Napier University’s School of Arts and Creative Industries in Edinburgh, gave a research seminar that proposed a different perspective on looking at the application of research in the creative arts and the humanities. Drawing on his experience as a reviewer, administrator, and researcher at various institutions in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom, he suggested that empathy helps to turn an alienating — and possibly daunting — process of applying for and reviewing research applications into a more rewarding experience.

‘The dynamic I have in mind is similar to the children’s party game of musical chairs’, Prof. Turner said about the life of an academic: ‘For in the production and evaluation of research, we constantly change our seating position from one side of the table to the other’. He elaborated by singling out all these moments when an academic changes positions — from being a student to becoming an instructor; from being a PhD candidate to becoming a supervisor; and then from being a supervisor to serving in various capacities, such as a reviewer, editor, administrator, departments head, or even a dean. Prof. Turner explained ‘As we join editorial boards, or take administrative roles in developing conferences or creating new institutes, we are still required to swap sides when we submit work for external research evaluation by those drafted in to sit on the other side of the table’. It is important to be able to see from the other side and deconstruct — as we pay homage to Derrida — differences that separate the two sides of the table.

Prof. Turner offered a number of anecdotes to illustrate issues — from advocating research in the creative arts in the UK to working to boost research rankings, and from collaborating with colleagues across disciplinary boundaries to proposing a new time allocation model for senior management. He suggested that trying to speak your interlocutor’s language goes a long way in research and research administration. Prof. Turner argued that researchers and reviewers do not necessarily have to be at the opposite sides of the adversarial table, and concluded by saying: ‘Naturally, empathy alone does not remove obstacles or resolve disputes, but it is a precondition for participative, if not collegial, exchange in the same way as any academic exchange’.

<back to top>

Seminar on ‘Success Factors in Mobile Learning Research’ and Workshop on ‘Experience Sharing and Discussion on Mobile Learning Research’

As the first event of the Open and Innovative Education Week, on 5 July Professor John Traxler, Professor of Mobile Learning at the University of Wolverhampton in the United Kingdom, was invited to deliver a seminar and lead a workshop on mobile learning research. In the seminar, Prof. Traxler presented the challenges of defining success in mobile learning research and attributing causality. He then analysed two differing mobile learning research worldviews in an effort to distil factors for sustainable success.

In the workshop, he outlined the discussion and developments within the mobile learning research community and defined the design space and design options for learning with mobiles freed from the legacy, methods and trajectory of using computers within institutions of formal education. A number of local scholars from various universities/institutions in Hong Kong were also invited to share their experiences in mobile learning research.

<back to top>

Workshop on ‘Useful Databases and Analytical Tools: Learning Analytics for the Social Media Age’

Dr Anatoliy Gruzd, Associate Professor in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, led a workshop on 7 July on using automated ways to unveil and analyse communication networks from social media. He discussed the limitations of traditional research methods, such as surveys, for collecting data on online networks. Then he introduced the analyser Netlytic, and explained how to use this tool, together with Social Network Analysis (SNA) to analyse publicly available online conversations. Dr Gruzd also explained how to use SNA to make inferences about formal and informal learning processes enabled by social media platforms, or even generate hypotheses about students’ participation in a course where online discussion is involved.

<back to top>

    

 

© Copyright 2016. The Open University of Hong Kong. All Rights Reserved.